National NRP Tricone Guitar Black Finish with Slimline Pickup Pre-Owned 2015 ID-10536

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Scale:
25 21/32"
Nut Width:
1.825"
Top:
Steel
Back:
Steel
Sold
$2,100.00

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National NRP

National NRP Tricone Guitar Black Finish with Slimline Pickup Pre-Owned 2015

In the 1920's, two Los Angeles men came together, originally to make a new type of guitar using the horn principle, whom would together create the National Resonator guitar as
we know it. The amount of responsibility each had in creating it is, as Brozman describes in his book, is disputed by the various parties. However, there's no doubt that both were important to the creation of the first Tricone guitar.

George Beauchamp's first idea was to create a "wild looking" Hawaiian guitar which sat on a stand and had a horn attached to the bottom. John Dopyera built it, as Brozman relates, "against his better judgment--he knew George's idea wouldn't work before it was made." Beauchamp did use this eccentric gizmo of a guitar on the vaudeville circuit, but abandoned it.  It was a perfect stage guitar with unusual looks, but it sounded terrible.

George then suggested to John that he build one based on the same principle as the mica disc on a Victrola. John experimented with various other materials, such as pressed fiber, glass, tin and other metals. He settled on a very thin, conical shaped aluminum resonator design, used in a set of three connected with a T-bar inside an all metal body.

Dopyera used three as it mellowed the sound, as opposed to using one large cone which was louder, but harsher in tone and with less sustain. He applied for a patent on this Tricone guitar in 1927, which was finally granted in 1930.

The Tricone design was originated in the 1920's and was based on the same principle as the mica disc on a Victrola. The designers settle on a very thin, conical shaped aluminum resonator design, used in a set of three connected with a T-bar inside an all metal body. Three were used due to the mellowed sound and increased sustain it produced, as opposed to using one large cone which was louder, but brighter in tone.

This National Slimline pickup incorporates all of the best qualities of an extremely warm sounding humbucker, while still being microphonic enough to amplify the nuances of the actual resonator vibrations.  You can hear the tonal differences between a Tricone and a Single-cone set up exactly the same.

This National NRP Tricone Guitar Black Finish with Slimline Pickup Pre-Owned 2015 is in Excellent Condition with only some light surface scratches on the top back and sides as well as 1 small dent/scratch on the back side near the lower bout. We have attempted to capture these in the detailed photos posted below.

Includes Original Hardshell Case.

Browse our fine selection of National Reso-Phonic Guitars.

Learn more about the history of National Reso-Phonic Guitars.

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